I have lost my mind in the process
euo:

Considering how dangerous everything is nothing is really very frighteningGertrude Stein: Everybody’s  Autobiography (1937)Mikko Kourinki

euo:

Considering how dangerous everything is nothing is really very frightening
Gertrude Stein: Everybody’s  Autobiography (1937)
Mikko Kourinki

(via cyborg-femme)

thegirlwiththeloontattoo:

People say “phase” like impermanence means insignificance. Show me a permanent state of the self.

(via cyborg-femme)

enchanter-of-brazening:

We’re in love and we’re REALLY ANNOYED ABOUT IT

(via cyborg-femme)

unfollower:

a fairy tale where the princess stuck in the tower has nothing better to do so she just works out all the time and gets ripped and kills the dragon herself

(via cyborg-femme)

languagethatiuse:

The Temptations. 

languagethatiuse:

The Temptations. 

(via vintagegal)

"The modern beauty industry, involving factory production and
the marketing of brands, originated in nineteenth century Europe and North America as a very local activity drawing on long-established craft traditions and beauty rituals. The use of beauty products themselves certainly did not originate in the nineteenth century. Indeed, for thousands of years, every known human civilization has used beauty aids of one kind or another, lending support to the view that the use of cosmetic artifices rested ultimately on biological imperatives to attract and to reproduce (Gunn, 1973; Jones, 2010a; Le Guérer, 2005; Morris, 1984; Subbarayappa, 1999; Wang, 2000). In most past societies, however, access to beauty products was largely restricted to elites who had sufficient leisure and income. During the nineteenth century, industrialization made it possible to manufacture products in larger volumes, often more cheaply; transport improvements enabled entrepreneurs to seek markets beyond their immediate locality, and so prompted the emergence of brands; and rising incomes, initially in towns, enabled larger numbers of people to
engage in discretionary spending, including on beauty products."

Globalization and Beauty: A Historical and Firm Perspective*, Geoffrey Jones, Harvard Business School, Harvard University

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

vintagegal:

Robert Doisneau- Bebop cellar, Vieux Colombier,  Paris, 1951 (via)

vintagegal:

Robert Doisneau- Bebop cellar, Vieux Colombier,  Paris, 1951 (via)

"The growth of the new beauty industry was initially modest
rather than dramatic. Moral objections to the use of color cosmetics lingered in many Western societies, especially outside major cities, until well into the twentieth century. Limited access to piped water and indoor plumbing restricted the demand for toiletries such as soap and toothpaste, again into the twentieth century, even in affluent Western countries. It has been estimated that only one-fifth of Americans used toiletries or cosmetics in 1916 (Peiss, 1998: 50)."

Globalization and Beauty: A Historical and Firm Perspective*, Geoffrey Jones, Harvard Business School, Harvard University

(via exgynocraticgrrl)


Sea World Superheroes - a group of professional water skiers who performed a regular theme park act dressed as DC Comics characters from 1976 to 1979. (via)

Sea World Superheroes - a group of professional water skiers who performed a regular theme park act dressed as DC Comics characters from 1976 to 1979. (via)

(via vintagegal)

"

Yesterday, a teacher at my daughter’s preschool told me that she saw two boys and a girl spinning the knobs of a play oven. Boy #1 says: “I’m a pilot! I’m flying a plane.’ Boy #2 says: “Me too!” The girl is quiet, so the teacher says to her: “What about you, are you a pilot?” The 3 year old girl replies: “I can’t be a pilot. I’m a pilot’s wife.”

So what do you think has happened in this little girl’s short life to make her believe it’s more likely that she would be a pilot’s wife than a pilot?

"

‘I’m not a pilot, I’m a pilot’s wife,’ says 3 yr old girl - reelgirl.com (via radical-bias)

(via ohshiitakemushrooms)

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