I have lost my mind in the process
colourthysoul:

Ron Hicks - Café Kiss

colourthysoul:

Ron Hicks - Café Kiss

(via victorianalexandratitanic)

"Letting go means to come to the realization that some people are a part of your history, but not a part of your destiny."

Steve Maraboli (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn
These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.
It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
Men speak more, more often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classrooms, boardrooms, legislative bodies, expert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.
The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”
This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.
Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60′s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off
In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”
 Really, practice those ten words. 
“Stop interrupting me.” 
“I just said that.”
“No explanation needed.”
 
 

sorayachemaly:

10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn

These behaviors, the interrupting and the over-talking, also happen as the result of difference in status, but gender rules.

  • It’s not hard to fathom why so many men tend to assume they are great and that what they have to say is more legitimate. It starts in childhood and never ends. Parents interrupt girls twice as often and hold them to stricter politeness norms. Teachers engage boys, who correctly see disruptive speech as a marker of dominant masculinity, more often and more dynamically than girls.
  • For example, male doctors invariably interrupt patients when they speak, especially female patients but patients rarely interrupt doctors in return. Unless the doctor is a woman. When that is the case, she interrupts far less and is herself interrupted more.
  • This is also true of senior managers in the workplace. Male bosses are not frequently talked over or stopped by those working for them, especially if they are women; however, female bosses are routinely interrupted by their male subordinates.
  • As adults, women’s speech is granted less authority. We aren’t thought of as able critics or as funny.
  • Men speak moremore often, and longer than women in mixed groups (classroomsboardroomslegislative bodiesexpert media commentary and, for obvious reasons religious institutions.)
  • Indeed, in male-dominated problem solving groups including boards, committees, and legislatures, men speak 75% more than women, with negative effects on decisions reached. That’s why, as researchers summed up, “Having a seat at the table is not the same as having a voice.”
  • Even in movies and television, male actors engage in more disruptive speech and garner twice as much speaking and screen time as their female peers.
  • Listserve topics introduced by men have a much higher rate of response.
  • On Twitter, people retweet men two times as often as women.

The best part though is that we are socialized to think women talk more. Listener bias results in most people thinking that women are hogging the floor when men are actually dominating. Linguists have concluded that much of what is popularly understood about women and men being from different planets, verbally, confuses “women’s language” with “powerless language.”

This preference for what men have to say, supported by men and women both, is a variant on “mansplaining.” The word came out of an article by writer Rebecca Solnit, who explained that the tendency some men have to grant their own speech greater import than a perfectly competent woman’s is not a universal male trait, but the “intersection between overconfidence and cluelessness where some portion of that gender gets stuck.” Solnit’s tipping point experience really did take the cake. She was talking to a man at a cocktail party when he asked her what she did. She replied that she wrote books, and she described her most recent one, River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West.The man interrupted her soon after she said the word Muybridge and asked, “And have you heard about the very important Muybridge book that came out this year?” He then waxed on, based on his reading of a review of the book, not even the book itself, until finally a friend said, “That’s her book.” He ignored that friend (also a woman) and she had to say it more than three times before “he went ashen” and walked away. If you are not a woman, ask any woman you know what this is like, because it is not fun and happens to all of us.

Last week as I sat in a cafe, a man in his 60s stopped to ask me what I was writing. I told him, a book about gender and media and he said, “I went to a conference where someone talked about that a few years ago. I read a paper about it a few years ago. Did you know that car manufacturers use slightly denigrating images of women to sell cars? I’d be happy to help you.” After I suggested, smiling cheerily, that the images were beyond denigrating and definitively injurious to women’s dignity, free speech, and parity in culture he drifted off

In the wake of Larry Summers’ “women can’t do math” controversy several years ago, scientist Ben Barres wrote publicly about his experiences, first as a woman and later in life, as a male. As a female student at MIT, Barbara Barres was told by a professor after solving a particularly difficult math problem, “Your boyfriend must have solved it for you.” When several years after, as Ben Barres, he gave a well-received scientific speech, he overhead a member of the audience say, “His work is much better than his sister’s.”  Most notably, he concluded that one of the major benefits of being male was that he could now “even complete a whole sentence without being interrupted by a man.”

 Really, practice those ten words

“Stop interrupting me.” 

“I just said that.”

“No explanation needed.”

 

 

(via all-about-male-privilege)

"

I said that I was somewhat reluctant to address this issue at all. It is not an easy thing to do. Feminists have been vilified for introducing the subject of the penis as a necessary political issue. An example of the kind of insult that greets our raising of this issue is this unsigned passage from the March Playboy— you know Playboy, that pro-woman, pro-feminist magazine:

For the past decade, the penis has been getting a lot of bad press. One feminist wrote derisively: “We can stimulate ourselves or be stimulated by other women as well as men can stimulate us, because that unique male offering, the phallus, is of peripheral importance, or may even be irrelevant to our sexual satisfaction.” Well, sit on my face, bitch. (Playboy, “Books,” vol. 27, no. 3, March 1980, p. 41)

I also call your attention to Playboy’s statement on freedom of speech in the same issue. A man asks the Playboy “Advisor”:

I have sex with my girlfriend often and we both enjoy it. However, something is missing. I want her to talk dirty. I want her to say things like: “I want to feel your giant cock in my pussy!” or “Cram your prick in and screw me!” We love each other very much and I’ve tried talking to her. I know she would do it if she could, and she wants to talk dirty, but when she tries, nothing comes out of her mouth and she gets upset with herself. What can we do?

Playboy’s answer is this:

Obviously, your girlfriend thinks that love means never having to say “Cram your prick in and screw me!” She should be reminded of her civic duty. The First Amendment guarantees freedom of expression—verbal, if not physical. (We have a hard time separating the two.) (“The Playboy Advisor,” Playboy, vol. 27, no. 3, March 1980, p. 51)

These two passages from Playboy— “Well, sit on my face, bitch” and “Cram your prick in and screw me!” — provide an anatomy of the situation. The coercion of the female is centered on getting her to have phallocentric sex. Feminists challenge the politics, the ethics, even the efficacy of this sexual institution, and the answer is “Well, sit on my face, bitch.” In this same value system, the First Amendment means that the woman, any woman, had better be prepared to say whatever the male wants to hear, especially that which enables him to heighten his sense of penile power. And most important, his First Amendment means that his right to determine her verbal expression is inseparable from his right to determine her physical expression.

"

Andrea Dworkin, Letters from a War Zone

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

thisismyaesthetic:

micdotcom:

7 dangerous myths about women who wear hijabs

The hijab is not the most important part of being a Muslim woman, but it is certainly the most visible. In a time when Islamophobia only seems to be on the rise in the West, a practice that is so personal and diverse has become a warped and misunderstood part of a flat and monolithic picture of Muslim women.

Read more

That’s riiiight

(via lifestylech0ice)

"You have to learn how to care about people without taking on all of their problems."

Phylicia Rashād in The Cosby Show (1987)

ancientart:

The Bhaja Caves of Maharashtra, India.

Bhaja contains about 29 rock-cut caves, which date back to the 2nd century BCE, and is described by the Archaeological Survey of India to be “one of the important Buddhist centres of Hinayana faith in Maharashtra.” 

A prominent features of Bhaja is Cave 12, a chaitya-griha, pictured in the final photo, which is considered one of the earliest of its kind. The stupa at the back of the large apsidal hall was used for worship. Cave 20 contains a group of stupas, which were built in memory of deceased monks, and probably once contained their relics.

Cave 18 was a monastery, and its verandah contains two famous sculpted reliefs. One of these (pictured in the 2nd photo) is located to the left of the door. This artwork depicts a person riding an elephant (thought by some to be Indra) who carries an ankusa (elephant goad), with attendants aside the figure, carrying a banner. The second relief shows a royal personage aside two women. The royal figure (who some identify as Sun god Surya), rides a chariot driven by four horses, and appears to be trampling a demon-like figure.

Photos courtesy of & taken by Himanshu Sarpotdar. The write-up of the site done by the Archaeological Survey of India was of great reference to me when writing this post.

(via vintagegal)

kartari:

things wrong with the sex positivity movement:

  • white women telling women of color to reclaim the word slut. we’re already either hypersexualized or desexualized and tbh we dont even have the luxury of being able to ~*~reclaim~*~ slurs like that 
  • sex posi feminists dont care about survivors of rape or sexual assault and they definitely dont care enough to examine how complicated sex can be for a person 
  • if you personally choose not to have sex, you’re automatically “slut shaming”
  • assuming that all religions are extremely harmful and therefore evil (mostly white feminists giving bullshit criticisms about islam) 
  • KINK SHAMING- seriously stop trying to defend pedophiles and racists with master/slave fantasies 
  • the notion that sex is necessary for a relationship to be meaningful or valid 
  • ignoring very real problems within the porn industry
  • highlighting the narrative of an empowered woman choosing to do sex work rather than paying any attention to victims of sex trafficking and their stories 
  • downplaying the part about how sex actually does emotionally impact you 
  • ignoring all consequences related to mental health that could arise if someone chooses to sleep around as prescribed by the ideal sex posi lifestyle
  • rushing people into sexual relationships and experimentation before theyre ready

(via punkjailbait)

tutorial

yungterra:

question: how do i make my photograph more tumblr relatable?

image

Simple:

  • filter
  • lowercase helvetica

image

  • for extra points: add japanese text

image

(via pixel-dreams-and-sunbeams)

gracediamondsfear:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

alicetookadrink:

Hey so to protect one of my friends I’ve decided to help her out by posting this on my blog instead. Please share this!

"This is Ian Foote. My husband and I met this man at one of my shows at the Rickshaw Theatre in East Vancouver last week and I added him on Facebook that same night because he and his girlfriend seemed nice enough.

WARNING TO WOMEN IN EAST VAN.

This man is a potential rapist who openly admits to having to forcibly stop himself from raping on the daily. Please spread this around, I want everyone in Vancouver to know to stay far away from this man.”

(Vancouver BC)

Please please please signal boost the fuck out of this you never know where your followers are. Thank you ♥

What fucking piece of shit.

This is a nightmare.  He thinks he’s being clever and cute about his disgusting tendencies.  And I’m sure once all of this gets out and the world understands what a monster he is he’ll claim it was all one big joke or social experiment or some shit.  Or that he was being sarcastic to prove a point. 

(via pixel-dreams-and-sunbeams)

1  2  3  4  5  
  next
Online Users